The Carter Family: Don't Forget This Song

The Carter Family Don t Forget This Song Winner of the Eisner Award for Best Reality Based Work The Carter Family Don t Forget This Song is a rich and compelling original graphic novel that tells the story of the Carter Family the first

  • Title: The Carter Family: Don't Forget This Song
  • Author: Frank M. Young DavidLasky
  • ISBN: 9780810988361
  • Page: 320
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Winner of the 2013 Eisner Award for Best Reality Based Work The Carter Family Don t Forget This Song is a rich and compelling original graphic novel that tells the story of the Carter Family the first superstar group of country music who made hundreds of recordings and sold millions of records Many of their hit songs, such as Wildwood Flower and Will the Circle Be UnbWinner of the 2013 Eisner Award for Best Reality Based Work The Carter Family Don t Forget This Song is a rich and compelling original graphic novel that tells the story of the Carter Family the first superstar group of country music who made hundreds of recordings and sold millions of records Many of their hit songs, such as Wildwood Flower and Will the Circle Be Unbroken, have influenced countless musicians and remain timeless country standards.The Carter Family Don t Forget This Song is not only a unique illustrated biography, but a moving account that reveals the family s rise to success, their struggles along the way, and their impact on contemporary music Illustrated with exacting detail and written in the Southern dialect of the time, its dynamic narrative is pure Americana It is also a story of success and failure, of poverty and wealth, of racism and tolerance, of creativity and business, and of the power of music and love Includes bonus CD with original Carter Family music Praise for The Carter Family What a fine marriage of form and content Humble and moving straightforward with occasional breathtaking bravura passages this book echoes the Carter Family s rough hewn sounds It tells of the lives, sorrows, and values of a lost America in short episodes like a giant stack of old 78s Using the vocabulary of comic strips like Little Orphan Annie and Gasoline Alley, it s as obsessive in its dedication to vernacular craft and hard work as A.P Carter himself Frank Young and David Lasky have spun a work of visual music that will replay in your head and heart well after you ve finished reading it Art Spiegelman, Pulitzer Prize winning writer artist of Maus Charming, faithful, and resonant will charm the pants off you The Comics Journal Lasky s gorgeous artwork animates the story and evokes a mood that mirrors the era and the music NPR Pure pleasure for anyone interested in music history The Seattle Times Cracking open The Carter Family feels like putting on a vintage 78 moody hearty Americana emanates hauntingly Enlivening this graphic biography of the legendary country music family are both Frank M Young s dialogue, which replicates the vernacular to a T but oh so naturally, and David Lasky s understated and elegant illustrations which resonate like the music they depict HeebMagazine

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      Posted by:Frank M. Young DavidLasky
      Published :2019-07-26T22:35:12+00:00

    Frank M. Young DavidLasky

    Frank M Young is an Eisner Award winning writer colorist and historian of comic arts He lives and works in Portland, Oregon.

    146 Comment

    • We now have around 90 years of recorded music – before 1925 it’s not that good, partly due to the poor songs ("Don’t Dilly Dally on the Way", "My Word you do Look Queer", "Ma He’s Making Eyes at Me") but mostly because they had to yell down a horn to record anything before 1925.The way popular Anglo-American music evolved over the decades was fast. Genres were borned, fizzed awhile, then phoenixed into something newer. I see this as a spectacular collaboration between Scottish, Irish and [...]

    • David Schaafsma

      (Oct 21, 2019 - 22:35 PM)

      AP Carter, his wife Sarah and his cousin Maybelle make up the Carter Family, who were foundational in country music, bridging the nineteenth century period of English and Scottish ballads, which they played, to the Old Time country music they spread from the Appalachians across the country. Who cares? Well Mother Maybelle, whose invention of a kind of guitar strumming influenced country music for a long time, and who was the Grandame of Country Music for decades of musicians, was the mother of J [...]

    • Ok, I read this book for a book club. It was first of all, pretty great, well told, quietly dramatic, but ultimately (and hence the 3 stars) extremely dry. Like I think it probably captured the reality of the story it was telling but it was documentary to the point of dragging. I was all prepared to go to book club and sing its praises but in hindsight, it was just okay, and I would not have sought it out or been particularly intrigued by it. I would rather watch a PBS documentary on the Carter [...]

    • This graphic novel deserves high praise. I guess my highest recommendation is that I stayed up until 1:30AM last night to finish reading this book. It tells the story of The Carter Family, focusing mostly, but by no means entirely, on AP Carter. The book reads almost like a modern passion play, including tales of innocence, love, betrayal, success, lonliness, racism, greed, and ultimately death, all anchored by the strength of family and love for music. One of the things I like most about the bo [...]

    • I read this sometime in the last year and will need to read it again before I can write a review. But I do remember enjoying it and learning quite a bit, so, for now I'll leave it at 4 stars.

    • Elizabeth (Miss Eliza)

      (Oct 21, 2019 - 22:35 PM)

      While it's a very interesting biography on the Carter Family, I feel that it suffers from a lack of actually showing their impact on music. What about the 50s, 60s, 70s? This just ends and it's over. Even just a timeline of later events would have shown the scope. As it is it feels like a story of musicians who might have been regionally popular but didn't have a big following. Which could be farther from the truth. Also the artist isn't good and distinguishing between characters and don't get m [...]

    • Owen Curtsinger

      (Oct 21, 2019 - 22:35 PM)

      A wonderfully charming and informative biography of an American family and their undeniably capital-A American story: their modest origins, their rise to greatness, flirtations with the dangers of business and profiteering, their struggles to maintain a family, and their heartbreaking downfall. Young and Lasky have perfected the art of graphic history, but not just because they have few great contemporaries to be found. Young's capturing of the old Virginian drawl coupled with Lasky's simple and [...]

    • I was very sorry indeed when I finished this book, I wanted it to keep going! A compelling and amazing story of one of America's greatest music acts. The characters come alive on the pages. The classic composition of the artwork harkens of Lil Orphan Annie, The Yellow Kid, Gasoline Alley, and other newspaper comics of the time. The old-timey feel to the linework and text, as well as the choice of colors, helped to create the time warp I took back to the 1920s, where I avidly followed the Carter [...]

    • Anyone not named Frank M. Young or David Lasky should just ask for their GN's back from the Eisner comitee.I have always been a fan of the band the Carter Family but, shy of June knew little about them.If you want to experiencee how wonderful and dreadful the South was in the 20's through the 40's this may be as close as you will ever get.The storytelling is down home but always wildly inventive. Just a joy to read even when thing got a bit dire and depressing.

    • This is just a fantastic book, really! And for some reason, the graphic novel format just matches up perfectly with the story that it tells. I am not particularly a fan of the Carter Family or their style of music, but I loved this book all the same.

    • Hell yeah! Quiet story about quiet people. Beautiful music.

    • I've been waiting years for this book. It didn't disappoint.

    • reviewing for Unshelved's Book Club

    • Brian Sendelbach

      (Oct 21, 2019 - 22:35 PM)

      Can't recommend this highly enough.

    • This is fantastic.

    • A very cool history of the Carter Family focusing on their "glory" years from the late 1920s to the '40s, written in graphic novel format.

    • Me sorprende que no tenga una puntuación más alta. La Familia Carter es poco conocida en España y siempre que la he oído mencionar ha sido en Melodías Pizarras o en Mondo Brutto. Este comic narra una parte de su historia mostrándola como un mundo pequeño, casi de fantasía, en la que unas personas crean sin saberlo, y sin darle importancia, una leyenda. Ellos están más preocupados por coner mañana, por llevar a los hijos al colegio, o por arreglar el coche. La sencillez de los personaj [...]

    • mariesbookgarden/Told in graphic novel style, The Carter Family tells the story of how this country's Americana grandmothers and grandfathers got their start in music. I enjoyed reading about the history of this talented musical family.

    • A strangely arms-length-distance biography of the titular singing group, done in the style of old-time comic strips. It's interesting, but it never really connected with me on an emotional level. I think this would be best read with a more book-length biography, because I spent a lot of time feeling like I didn't quite "get it." Clearly a labor of love for the artist and writer, and very well done, but it just didn't work for me as a casual fan.

    • This is my first "graphic novel experience," unintended and . . . disappointing (at best). I requested a number of books from different libraries, because I have a great love for the music of The Original Carter Family. They were what is called a bridge band, in that they somehow bridged the cultural chasm between 19th century ballads, Irish scaffold songs, laments and hymns and the emerging musical tastes shaped by the modernity of the 20th. A.P. Carter is responsible for mining the hills for v [...]

    • Frank Young and David Lasky’s Carter Family is told almost like a serialized comic. Many “chapters” are 1-4 pages long, detailing a particular event -- Maybelle marrying AP’s brother Eck, or AP asking his publisher to give songwriting credit to a fellow song collector. Being less familiar with the Carter Family’s story, some of these events suggested portent (Janette saving up for her own autoharp and AP buying chickens with the money instead) or highlights that I didn’t recognize (t [...]

    • This graphic novel is, as its title suggests, about the Carter Family -- a husband, a wife, and a cousin in Virginia who become successful country/folk singers (one member of the group is mother to a little girl who will grow up to be June Carter Cash, although June's appearance in this book is relatively minor). We start with the courtship of two of the he group's singers, see the process by which Pleasant Carter assembles and arranges songs, and watch as they catch attention, grow popular, end [...]

    • This is one of the greatest musical biographies and graphic novels I have ever read. It is a great supplement to the more detailed Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone?: The Carter Family and Their Legacy in American Music. This book makes you feel as if you are a personal friend of the Carter's. You see their struggles and their triumphs first hand. The centerpiece of the story is A.P the flawed yet brilliant and under-appreciated folk song collector. His impact on country music is enormous, and it w [...]

    • Graphic novel biography of the Carter Family. The Carter Family helped to define the early days of country music, singing hymns and ballads out of the mountain tradition. A P Carter traveled the mountains of Appalachia to find music add to their repertoire, music that might have dies away if he had not collected it. A P's cousin, Maybelle, played the guitar, and his wife, Sarah, played an auto-harp. Maybelle developed a way of strumming and picking out the notes to the melody that had great infl [...]

    • This is fairly well-done, based on thorough very research of relevant interviews (some conducted by the author) and archival materials. The drawing style is reminiscent of Harold Gray's Little Orphan Annie or perhaps latter-day Chester Brown in his Louis Riel mode. It's a compelling story and Young paces the material nicely, though it sometimes feels a bit like a book report, with certain sequences being overburdened with info-dumps about things like developments in recording technology, etc. Th [...]

    • Over the last ten years through my association with WRUW FM 91.1 in Cleveland, I have become a fan of "classic" country music and the Carters are basically the progenitors of all country music that came after (and rock 'n' roll as well.) This work has a lot of potential, since we already know what is possible with biographical graphic novels in works like Maus and Persepolis, but ultimately it falls short. The graphic novel does a good job of laying out the story of the Carters, but we don't rea [...]

    • If you've never heard of the Carter Family, you're missing a huge part of American music history. Countless acts have professed influence from the timeless melodies crafted by the Carters. This graphic novel seeks to tell their story. It is, by turns, a love story, an all-American rags-to-riches tale, and an homage to traditional music. It's a great story, but I'm not sure if the graphic novel format is ideal. Granted, it does make for a very accessible introduction to the Carter Family (and eve [...]

    • A graphic portrayal of June Carter-Cash's musical family - it does not cover June's life but rather the life of her parent's. Even more so her aunt, uncle, and cousins. This was a huge disappointment. I was definitely looking forward to reading about June, her sisters, and Maybelle, which were the individuals I thought made up The Carter Family musical group . It was actually Alvin Pleasant (A.P.), Maybelle's brother-in-law, that began the group. He was a huge jerk, and worse, to everyone. I hon [...]

    • The writing and the contents of this book are outstanding. The artwork is a slight weakness that kept me from giving it a fifth star.In addition to being an overview of the history of the Carter family, this work includes a brief CD of their music, from their time on a Texas border radio station, in 1939. The format of the book, with each chapter name coming from the name of one of their songs, was clever and well thought out. By the end of the book, the reader has learned a lot about the family [...]

    • I love the Carter Family and was glad to learn more about their place in American history. I don't know if this book would appeal to readers who weren't already fans of their music, because the focus is on the singers' difficult personal lives, rather than trying to give readers some flavor of the songs themselves. I respect the tremendous amount of work that went into condensing all this history into a short illustrated biography. However, I felt the authors didn't tap into the storytelling pot [...]

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